Canadenses e seus filhos deveriam aprender português do Brasil, afirma empresário

ECONOMIA E COMÉRCIO por Gilda Salomone Na semana passada, em um artigo publicado no jornal Vancouver Sun, o empresário Ray Castelli incitava os Canadenses a ver o Brasil como uma terra de oportunidades para empresas, para a população e, por que não, para as crianças canadenses. Ray Castelli é diretor executivo da Weatherhaven, uma das principais fornecedoras de sistemas de abrigos montáveis e desmontáveis do mundo para os setores militar, naval, da construção civil e de exploração de recursos naturais e desenvolvimento de infraestrutura. Localizada em Burnaby, na Colúmbia Britânica, a empresa foi fundada há 30 anos e atua Brasil desde 2001. A Weatherhaven foi uma das empresas convidadas a participar da missão comercial do primeiro-ministro Stephen Harper ao Brasil, em agosto deste ano. Na última quinta-feira, Gilda Salomone conversou com Ray Castelli sobre as oportunidades comerciais no Brasil e sobre a importância de se fazer negócios em português. Você acha que as crianças canadenses deveriam aprender o português do Brasil, para aproveitar futuras oportunidades de negócios ou empregos? Deixe seu comentário abaixo ou escreva para brasil@rcinet.ca, dizendo o que você...

Should our kids be learning Brazilian Portuguese?

BY RAY CASTELLI, SPECIAL TO THE VANCOUVER SUN Many parents I know have enrolled their kids in French immersion schools, or weekend Mandarin courses, in an effort to prepare the next generation for a competitive future world of open trading markets and portable skills. While commendable and far-sighted, I wonder how many parents have considered preparing their children for a world where Brazil becomes an economic powerhouse and significant trading partner for Canada? I suspect not many. That should change. Why should Brazil matter to Canada? It’s now the world’s seventh largest economy, one of the fastest growing and projected to be No. 5 within a few short years. Its natural resource based economy is similar to Canada’s, as are the vast distances that separate its resources from its main population centres. Most importantly, it is a rapidly developing economy with specific needs — many of which Canada is uniquely positioned to address. It should be no surprise, therefore, that one of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s first foreign trade missions, since winning a new mandate, was to Brazil. Or that our new Trade Minister, Ed Fast, has already helped arrange two trade missions to that country in the past 100 days. What they see is an opportunity for our businesses, our people and ultimately for our children. Canada has much to offer Brazil. We have 80-plus years of experience in developing a natural resource economy, building critical infrastructure, and traversing large tracts of sensitive terrain in order to connect our resources to our population base. Developing infrastructure is a major priority for Brazil. In addition to hosting both the...

Staking out new ground

Among the entourage of government officials and prominent business leaders who accompanied Prime Minister Stephen Harper on an early-August trade mission to Brazil was the chief executive officer of a relatively obscure Canadian company called Weatherhaven. Established in 1981, Weatherhaven outfits militaries, relief organizations, exploration firms, peacekeeping operations and others with portable and reusable shelters for places and situations that most people would rather avoid in the first place. Eighty percent of the base camps in Antarctica rely on their products, and increasingly, the shelters are finding their way into the humid and sweltering recesses of Brazil’s Amazonian basin. To operate in one of the most exciting growth markets on the planet, the company had to grapple with Brazil’s strict regulatory apparatus and leap over a menacing tariff wall that keeps out foreign-made products and workers. “The attitude down there is: there is so much opportunity in Brazil that, even though there is a cost of doing business here, the size of the pie and the reward is sufficiently large that it’s worth paying that cost,” says Ray Castelli, CEO of Weatherhaven. After 10 years of activity, they’ve only begun to penetrate the markets of the world’s seventh-largest economy. Weatherhaven’s shelters, some of which resemble large greenhouses, are actually sophisticated structures that come equipped with generators, water treatment systems and even creature comforts like plasma screen televisions. They can be set up in minutes with basic tools and last up to 20 years. In the early days, the company’s products were used mainly by mining and exploration firms in Canada’s north, offering workers respite from extreme temperatures and conditions....

Canadian Designed Hospital-In-A-Box Fits Inside Chinook Helicopters and Can Be Set Up Anywhere to Save Lives

VANCOUVER — One of the many dangers in today’s humanitarian or military operations is the exposure of helicopters and their aircrews when flying into hostile environments with vital high-value equipment slung under the aircraft, making them easier targets. With an under-slung load, the CH-47 Chinook helicopter’s Defensive Aids Suite (DAS) is effectively redundant and the full flight envelope compromised when flying in challenging terrain. In the past, it has led to damage to aircraft and this high-value, life-saving equipment being released and destroyed when in mid-flight, delaying medical care to troops and civilians. In response, Weatherhaven has developed the innovative Tactical Redeployable Expanding Container Capability (TRECC) system of shelters that can fit inside the body of a CH-47 and be flown at high speed to emergencies. The TRECC will be launched at one of the world’s largest defence and security shows in September at London’s DSEi 2011. For over 15 years, Weatherhaven has been at the forefront of expandable containerized shelters that are used from the Arctic to Antarctica and from the Amazon to Africa. he new TRECC system consists of modular units that can be shrunk in size and are lightweight enough to transport inside a CH-47 Chinook helicopter (TRECC-H, Helicopter variant), or on the back of a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV) (TRECC-V, Vehicle variant). The TRECC-H has a payload volume of 11.8 cu m (418 cu ft), enough space to stow a medical triage unit, which incorporates the latest fibre-optic communications technology. When the helicopter lands, the TRECC can be deployed within minutes. The roof rises to eight feet and the sides unfold to provide...

Canadian and Brazilian companies join forces to help HRT Oil and Gas establish a new standard for sustainable clean energy exploration in the Amazon

Weatherhaven of Canada and Esbracon of Brazil today, on the heels of the visit of Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper to Brazil, sealed a long-term agreement with HRT of Brazil to design and deliver a new standard of exploration camps for the company’s clean energy exploration and production program in the Amazon. These camps will provide the best available worldwide technology to deliver the highest standards of environmental sensitivity, sustainability and employee health, safety and comfort – within a simple and functional framework. HRT, who also recently acquired a Canadian Oil & Gas company, has been a shining star of the Brazilian BOVESPA since initiating one of Brazil’s largest ever IPOs of $1.5B last November. This investor interest has been driven, in large part, due to their massive confirmed oil and gas potential and innovative approach to exploration, production, logistics and sustainability. The operations will employ the highest standards of sustainability in drilling practices, camp infrastructure, waste management, water minimization, and recyclability as well as a complete carbon offset matrix. This is addition to having one of the world’s cleanest sources of light oil and gas – which also has very low CO2, Nitrogen or Sulphur content. The long-term agreement will involve the implementation of a total integrated sustainable camps program in order to fulfill HRT’s rapid mobilization, addressing the logistical challenges of developing this infrastructure in a remote and environmentally sensitive region like the Amazon. The long-term development of HRT’s projects – both in the Amazon and the coast of Namibia – could involve as many as 10 more sustainable camp projects. “HRT chose Weatherhaven and Esbracon because,...